Women Rights History with Suffragette Alice Hawkins

From the 13th to the 17th of August 2018, from 4 pm !

Peter Barratt, great grandson of suffragette Alice Hawkins is coming back to the Centre this year to give a passionate talk about his great grand mother’s path and achievement’s in terms of the women rights !

With a statue of Alice unveiled earlier this centenary year and her very own suffragette memorabilia currently on loan to the UK Parliament as a star feature in the summer Voice and Vote exhibition, her great-grandson Peter Barratt will give a stirring and passionate account of Alice’s suffrage campaign over a 100 years ago.

Learn about Alice Hawkins and who she was…

Alice Hawkins was one such lady. Born in 1863 in Stafford of a working class background, Alice left school at thirteen to spend her working life as a shoe machinist, in the ‘boot and shoes’.

From her early teens Alice realised that the working conditions and pay for women in industry were inferior to that of their male colleagues and so began a lifetime work of participation in the boot and shoe trade union to try to improve this. Alice was lucky in her early twenties, for she joined the Equity Shoe factory which had been newly formed as a worker’s co-operative.

 

The Equity actively encouraged workers to participate in political organisations and allowed time off when necessary.

When the role of the suffragette movement, at the turn of the last century, in gaining the right for women to vote is raised, many people immediately think of the Pankhurst family and their achievements. Whilst this, to a large extent is rightly so, there were many women of all social backgrounds who also supported the cause and in so doing, suffered much hardship and imprisonment at the hands of an uncaring Government of the day.

More Info Here

 

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